Adventures in University Study

As some may already be aware, I am finally embarking on a Master’s degree in October, ten years after graduating from Middlesex University’s ‘Creative and Media Writing’ degree programme. This time, I’ll be studying ‘Modern and Contemporary Literature’ at Birkbeck – a university which offers part-time study and evening classes, which is essential as I am (sadly!) in no position to give up my day job just yet.

Initially I was terrifically excited about the whole venture, and I still am, but a certain trepidation has begun to creep in. Can I do this? Am I capable? Will I be able to balance studying with a full-time job and living my life? More than that, though, my old friend impostor syndrome is making itself known, though not without basis. In preparation for studying at MA level, I’ve embarked upon a summer school programme offered by Birkbeck, designed to prepare the new intake of students for the intricacies of MA level study – the module covers research, seminar skills, academic English and so on.

I feel horribly out of my depth all of a sudden. Some of the academic essays contained within the programme seem almost impenetrable, both in their use of language and introduction of concepts I’ve never encountered before. I’ve always considered myself reasonably intelligent, but I’m struggling to understand quite a lot of what’s being presented to me – and I feel incredibly poorly-read in terms of schools of thought, literary conventions and concept, philosophies and even the texts themselves. (How have I got to be 31 years of age and never even attempted to read James Joyce’s Ulysses? Which, by the way, I am absolutely dreading.)

I know that this is probably normal, to some extent. I know that the entire point of me studying is to learn, and to broaden my mind; hopefully at the end of the course I will find all of this far easier to grasp, but for now I am trying to swallow down a quiet terror of failing horribly, or of being the only person on the course who doesn’t understand half of what’s being said. I’m worried I’ll study for two years, incur a vast debt on top of my existing vast debt, and emerge with barely a passing grade.

There’s also the matter of time, or lack thereof. The amount of reading and work entailed by the course almost guarantees that I will barely be able to read for fun, or to write stories. The fear here is twofold: how much will I miss out on? How can I support my fellow writers if I can’t read or purchase their work? How big will my TBR pile grow? And also, selfishly: if I don’t write for the next two years, will I fade into obscurity? Am I about to miss out on big opportunities? Will anyone even care if my stories disappear off the face of the earth? (And I assure you, I am not fishing for kind words here: I am aware of how daft my worries are, and how little any of this matters in any case.)

It’s not all bad. There is a horror module to be studied, which I am very excited about, and Angela Carter features prominently in the compulsory second-year module. Plus there are modules on postcolonial literature and feminist literature which look fascinating. I know this is a risk worth taking, but – sometimes, my brain is only ever able to focus on the word ‘risk’.

A Suggestion Of Ghosts

Esteemed horror author & editor Johnny Mains has unearthed some real treasures and compiled them into an anthology – the result is A Suggestion of Ghosts, a compilation of supernatural stories by female authors, previously published but never reprinted. The stories date from between 1826-1897, putting paid to the notion that women in horror is a relatively new phenomenon. I’m terrifically excited to discover some long-hidden gems.

The book is available for pre-order from Black Shuck Book.

Launching the Bones at Edge-Lit

I had anticipated that my first ever Edge-Lit would be a universally terrifying event. Besides the usual people-related nervousness (horror people are lovely, social anxiety less so) there was also the fact that I would be launching my novella. In person. In front of people. Cue visions of a mountain of unsold books, Eric Carmen’s ‘All By Myself’ playing in the background.

Fortunately I had underestimated the friendly, cosy atmosphere – a multitude of familiar faces and some new ones, all equally lovely, crammed into a small space filled with likeminded people. I’d brought my husband along too, and while he was a stranger to most of the people there it wasn’t long before he’d been welcomed into the fold as well.

The launch itself went better than I could have hoped for. It was a shared launch, both for my novella and for Mark West’s excellent collection ‘Things We Leave Behind’, both published by Dark Minds Press. (A word about Dark Minds Press: they are superb to work with, take excellent care of their authors and I would recommend them to anyone in a heartbeat.) Mark and I each read from each other’s work, which was Mark’s idea and in my opinion a stroke of genius – it’s much easier and less nervewracking to read from someone else’s story, which you are enthusiastic about, than it is to try to ‘sell’ your own!

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(l-r Mark West, Ross Warren, me)

We managed to sell all copies of both our books, which was obviously incredibly exciting. (Mark’s traditional post-con bloggage can be found here.)

Though there were some notable faces missing from the event (who I very much hope will be at Fantasycon, as they were missed!) it was a great day – the redshirts were on typically good form and everything ran like clockwork. I also got to see Joanne Harris, Alison Moore, Andrew Michael Hurley, Marie O’Regan and Catriona Ward talking about literary horror and the interplay between the two genres, which was a great panel – Joanne Harris in particular was persuasive and a joy to listen to.

As to the general classiness and excellency of the Dark Minds team – check out the special gift I got from Ross & Anthony. I’m glad my eternal love for Alex Krycek is so well known!

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